Seriously Rogers? Seriously!?!?!?!

Don't be fulled by this hospitals beautiful architecture. It's hell. Literally.
Don’t be f00led by this hospitals beautiful architecture. It’s hell. Literally.

Rogers Memorial Hospital in Oconomowac, Wisconsin. For many of my blog readers, you are well-aware that this hell-hole was where I was held hostage for 3 months of my life all because of my damn eating disorder.

When I was sent there just under 3 years ago, the Child & Adolescent Eating Disorder Inpatient was housed in a separate facility in West Allis, a small suburb of the booming city of Milwaukee. But on December 2nd of this year, that has all changed. The unit has been moved to their main campus in Oconomowac where sick children ages 8 – 18 will be subjected to new forms of traumatizing neglect and torture.  One of these new forms of torment include the introduction of motion sensors. These motion sensors are suppose to monitor a patient’s movement, allowing staff to prevent even the slightest increase in calorie burn.

So you may be wondering why I hate the idea of motion sensors so much. I mean, they’re suppose to protect this poor kids from the power of their deadly eating disorder, right? Well, yes but I think they are going about protecting these unfortunate patients in the wrong way.  I am strongly against using too much technology to treat eating disorder. Technology is so cold, it has no soul or no heart. It can’t comfort these patients when they require the love and care of a real human. All it can do is provide the staff with hard data, nothing more.

When an individual is held in the firm grasp of their eating disorder and participates in compulsive exercise, they are facing some of the most intense emotional torment the world has ever known. In their eyes, exercise is the only way they can feel like they have control over the emotional hell they are going through. Taking this into account, I believe it is quite apparent that these shattered souls do not need the supervision of some heartless technology. What they need is the constant care and love of a kindhearted, personal caretaker. This caretaker would be with the patient through thick and thin and help the patient work through the loud, castigating voice of their eating disorder.  But don’t worry, the person would be nothing like the staff at Rogers – where they treat patients in a punitive, cruel fashion when they partake in the ED behaviors they have no control over. Instead, they would be like Peggy Claude-Pierre, the heart-warming woman who changed the face of eating disorder treatment. The caretaker would comfort the patient when the urge to exercise, purge, or restrict is strong. This would not only defend the patient from Ed, it would also prove to the patient that they are wonderful and lovable – something so many people with eating disorders don’t realize.

So Rogers, if you are reading this, please rethink your whole philosophy of eating disorder treatment. Every single child that was with me in treatment relapsed. That’s just proof that what you do at your hospital is not working. AT ALL!!!!!!!!

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4 thoughts on “Seriously Rogers? Seriously!?!?!?!

  1. They wanted to send my daughter here. I’m still not against it by any means because im sure everyone has their own experiences and opinions. Not sure what the motion thing is all about but it sounds like an experiment.

    1. I would recommend Timberline Knolls or Mirasol. I’ve heard good things about both these treatment centers.

    1. I know right! I wish treatment center would realize we are actual human beings and that they didn’t punish us for having an illness we did not choose 😦

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